Heritage

Heritage

Anyone who reads here with any regularity probably has figured out that I love beautiful music, and am especially partial to Celtic and Irish tunes.  I had a friend who once told me I lived a previous life in Ireland.  I might believe that if I were more interested in a pint or two, but alas, I’m not a drinker.  I do, however, regret that my mother forbade dancing when I was a child.  Any kind of dancing was considered a mortal sin, you know.

There is such history in dance.  Think of Russian ballet; of the minuet; of rain dances and the Twist and the Mashed Potato.

Irish music has its own origins, buried early in the mists of Celtic awakenings.  The following tribute from YouTube tells the tender story behind its birth:

I have danced THAT dance more than a few times, myself!  In spite of my mom’s moratorium on the act!

A couple of slightly more sober (so to speak) notes:

Remember a rant I had a few days back about the fragile nature of civilization?  I’m not alone.  The National Weather Service says a couple of belts of massive solar flares, well within the realm of possibility over the next couple of years, could cause a cascade of effects that would wipe out our electrical grid, possibly for DECADES.  The story is here.

In what may be the most singularly incredible positive news for cancer patients, there has been a possible breakthrough on treatment, on an unprecedented scale.  The testing has been limited so far to exactly three patients because – hello? – big pharma couldn’t be bothered.  The end result, however, is that all three terminal leukemia patients have seen massive reversals of the disease.  Two went from terminal stages to cancer free within just a few weeks, and a year later they are STILL cancer free.  The third person’s treatment reduced the disease by 70%.  Details here.

Ah well, can’t stay sober forever, can you?  As a little aside, I thought I’d include that the UK has released a bunch of its UFO files and made them downloadable for anyone interested.  There’s no debate introduced as to whether or not UFOs exist; the closest thing to controversy is that the British government is too broke to do anything about them.

Come to think of it maybe that’s not such a big surprise after all.

OH!  And before I forget (again): we got a new TV!

Well okay not exactly a new TV.  It was, however, both new to us and a digital set so if we’re ever too broke for satellite we can go back to antenna without a converter box.  It’s one of the tube TVs that supports digital.  G found it on Craigslist for free.  One of our old tube sets (old enough it didn’t even have closed captioning, or at least none that I could find) was slowly dying.  The picture was great but the sound?  Going, going, nearly gone.  We could’ve propped it up with a home theater system but as G pointed out, it would be ridiculous to spend money on an old TV that might just crap out completely the next day.  So we’d been looking for another tube set on the cheap, with hopes we’d get something at least in the realm of closed captioning.

We may be the only people on planet earth who DON’T want LCD/LED/plasma.  I used to be a tech on those things.  They are designed to fail – literally so.  They come with a lamp that, if you’re among the lucky, might possibly last three years.  If you watch a lot of TV it is probably going to be DOA in 18 months or less.  Lamps cost nearly as much as the sets cost these days, and they’re just one of a bajillion things that can go south on those things.  So no thanks – gimme a tube set which is also substantially more energy efficient.  This one’s flat screen and the size (27″) was exactly what G wanted.  Since he’s the one who watches most of the TV at the house it was a good fit.


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